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Who can be a relator?

January 19, 2015   |  
Any person who has legitimately obtained evidence of fraud which is not public knowledge may be able to file a qui tam case. Actions under the False Claims Act are commonly brought by employees or former employees of an individual or business who is committing fraud. Sometimes, knowledge of fraud...
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What is a relator?

January 19, 2015   |  
Normally, the person who begins a lawsuit is called the plaintiff. In qui tam actions, the person who brings the suit is referred to as the relator. The relator is actually suing on behalf of the federal government, who would be the plaintiff.
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What types of fraud does the False Claims Act cover?

January 19, 2015   |  
The False Claims Act covers most instances of fraud involving a federally-funded program like Medicare, Medicaid, construction contracts, or defense projects. The number of possible scenarios where fraud could be committed are limitless, but in general, they consist of four general actions: Knowingly presenting to the federal government a false...
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What is the difference between qui tam and the False Claims Act?

January 19, 2015   |  
Qui tam refers to the action of filing a lawsuit on behalf of the government. The False Claims Act is one statute which authorizes qui tam cases in certain circumstances (i.e., after someone makes a false claim). Other statutes also authorize qui tam actions, such as the Internal Revenue Service’s...
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What is the False Claims Act?

January 19, 2015   |  
The False Claims Act is a federal statute which makes it illegal to file a false claim for payment with the government or with a government program. The statute gives citizens the ability to sue on behalf of the government to expose people or companies who are making false claims.
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What is a qui tam case?

January 19, 2015   |  
Qui tam cases are lawsuits filed against a person or entity by a private citizen on behalf of the government. Qui tam cases are more commonly known as whistleblower lawsuits, as the person who files the case is “blowing the whistle” and exposing fraud or wrongdoing against the government.
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